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Diversity & Inclusion Librarian of the Month: Femi Cadmus Femi Cadmus I am law library director, associate dean, and professor of practice at Cornell Law School. My foray into law librarianship started 27 years ago and I have a deep passion for initiatives that facilitate and contribute to free and open access to legal information. On the volunteer side, I am currently Vice-President/President-Elect of AALL. What do you envision in the future of diversity and inclusion in law librarianship?  I believe there will continue to be a heightened awareness of diversity and inclusion in the profession through relevant training and programs. ...
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Diversity & Inclusion Librarian of the Month: Meg Butler Meg Butler As a mid-career librarian, I have worked exclusively in an academic law library environment. I have found it to be a place where my interests in classroom teaching, data management, working with patrons of all skill/knowledge levels, and access to justice intersect. What do you envision in the future of diversity and inclusion in law librarianship? In SEAALL (Southeastern Chapter American Association of Law Libraries), I have the pleasure of joining Shamika Dalton, Beau Steenken, Endia Sowers Paige, and Nichelle Perry as the inaugural committee members of the chapter ...
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Diversity & Inclusion Librarian of the Month: Janice Henderson Janice Henderson Throughout my career in the legal industry I have been a law librarian, project manager, teacher, speaker, CLE developer, and knowledge manager. I am a member of both AALL and LLAGNY and have always volunteered to support both organizations. Supporting your colleagues who have been instrumental in your career is the best way I know to pay it back. What do you envision in the future of diversity and inclusion in law librarianship? A lot of organizations are developing or have diversity and inclusion committees. The first step is to recognize the differences ...
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In light of the #metoo campaign, some law library patrons may be looking for information about the law and sexual harassment, discrimination, and assault.  Here's what I've found today.  If you've come across other helpful resources, please let me know. Professor Deborah Rhode of Stanford Law School provides a succinct explanation of this topic at https://law.stanford.edu/2017/10/18/sexual-harassment-and-the-law/ The ABA Commission on Women in the Profession has collected resources on harassment and discrimination, bullying of women in the workplace, and pertinent state agency materials at http://bit.ly/womenlawmetoo . These opinion pieces have two quite ...
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I'll take AALL at its word: they've already signed up John Waters as the keynote speaker for the 2018 AALL Conference in (of course) Baltimore! I was thinking at first, what's the link between John Waters and law libraries?  But then I realized, John Waters has gotten in trouble with both the law and libraries for years with his provocative work, especially from his shocking early years.  (Note: Waters' most recent book is called " Make Trouble ."  He's been good at that.) Upon research, I've found more connections.  He's said "if I wasn’t a filmmaker I would have been a criminal defense lawyer , and I think I would have been pretty good."  He's exhibited ...
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Pokémon Go appeared one year ago today (in the US and Oceania).  Within days, it was a massive hit.  Within weeks, it seemed to be taking over the world.  Within months ... it faded.  There were other matters occupying our attention -- Donald Trump comes to mind. And yet ... it's still around.  According to Pokémon Go's developer, players caught 16 million Pokémon in one day in June in New York City. (Players in London and in Toyko caught even more Pokémon.)  The developer also stated in April that there were over 65 million players worldwide each month.  Maybe this translates to, say, a few million people in the US playing Pokemon Go once or twice per month ...
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The Supreme Court ended its October 2016 term earlier this week. During this term, the Court issued Star Athletica, L.L.C. v. Varsity Brands, Inc. on March 22, 2017, holding that an artistic feature incorporated into the design of a useful article is eligible for copyright protection. You can read our issue brief on this decision here . In late May, the Court also issued  Impression Products, Inc. v. Lexmark International, Inc. , which addressed the scope of the patent exhaustion doctrine. In its discussion on the question of international exhaustion, the Court heavily referred to and followed the logic of Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. , ...
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On Thursday the U.S. Copyright Office released a report summarizing the findings from its study of the operation of 17 U.S.C. 1201. Section 1201, which was enacted in 1998 as a part of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, places prohibitions on the circumvention of technological protection measures (TPMs) that control access to and copying of works. The section contains several exceptions, and also enacts a triennial rulemaking cycle in which the Librarian of Congress can grant additional exemptions. In December 2015, the Copyright Office first called for comments on the operation of Section 1201. The American Association of Law Libraries responded to both ...
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Conan O'Brien is currently involved in copyright litigation in the Southern District of California, on the claims that he stole jokes.  The case is Kaseberg v. Conaco, LLC et al 3:15-cv-01637. Defendants include Conan O’Brien, various writers on his show, and Conaco, Conan’s production company. Judge Janis L. Sammartino ruled that the jokes were held under very thin protection, but would not grant Conaco summary judgment on charges that they stole jokes from comedy writer Robert Alexander Kaseberg, who has his own blog and has been a comedy writer for more than 20 years.  Kaseberg has contributed to television and radio, including submitting over 1,000 jokes ...
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The Ninth Circuit recently ruled that federal copyright law preempted the right-of-publicity state law claims brought by two former NCAA Division III basketball players in Maloney v. T3Media, Inc. T3Media contracts with the NCAA to store, host, and license images in the NCAA Photo Library. The plaintiff-appellants, two former student athletes, alleged that T3Media exploited their names and likenesses by selling non-exclusive licenses permitting customers to download photographs from the NCAA Photo Library for non-commercial art use without obtaining their consent. The statutory provision in the Copyright Act pertaining to preemption is 17 U.S.C. § ...
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On March 9th the Copyright Office launched a new blog, Copyright: Creativity at Work . The first post to the blog, by Acting Register Karyn Temple Claggett, introduces the members of the Office. Future posts will provide information on the work of the Office, including studies, reports, and registration, as well as new developments in copyright law.
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Last year, I attended AALL’s annual meeting in Chicago. While there, I signed up for a conference-sponsored dinner. Halfway through dinner, one of the people seated with me turned my way and asked, “So, Beth, how’s the outsourcing going at your firm?” Another person at our table, a man from California, added, “Yeah, some of the California State schools outsourced their libraries. They let everyone go and hired new people at way lower salaries.” Outsourcing law libraries isn’t a new topic; it’s been written about plenty. But the prevailing thought about outsourcing – or a library as a service – ...
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Ah, July 2016. The AALL Annual Meeting. The nominations of Trump and Clinton. Pokémon Go. Back in the day -- seven months ago -- I mused ( twice! ) about the connections between Pokémon Go and legal research. Since then, Pokémon Go has gone from a game that was changing the world to just another game. But wait ... there's an update : more Pokémon; more evolutions; more candy; and more! I doubt Pokém on Go will take over everything like it did in July. But you might see a few law students, attorneys, random visitors, and maybe even a hip judge (Neil Gorsuch, anyone?) stop by your place of employment if it's got ...
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art implemented a new Open Access policy on February 7, which makes more than 375,000 images of public-domain artworks in The Met’s collection available for free, unrestricted use. The Met’s digital catalog identifies images in the public domain with a Creative Commons Zero icon below the image: Creative Commons Zero (CC0) means that "[t]he person who associated a work with this deed has dedicated the work to the public domain by waiving all of his or her rights to the work worldwide under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights, to the extent allowed by law. You can copy, modify, distribute ...
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AALL's Government Relations Office has released an Issue Brief from the Copyright Committee discussing Fox News Network, LLC v. TVEyes, Inc. , a case from the Southern District of New York. In 2013, Fox News sued TVEyes, claiming that TVEyes' inclusion of Fox News content in a searchable database of broadcast media was copyright infringement. TVEyes countered that its use of Fox News' content was fair use. The Southern District of New York issued two decisions, in 2014 and 2015, and the case is currently on appeal to the Second Circuit.
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Wanting go to the 110th AALL Annual Meeting & Conference in Austin, TX, July 15-18 and need some financial assistance to attend? Then the Annual Meeting Grant is for you. The Annual Meeting Grant Awards Jury is seeking applications for the AALL Annual Meeting Grant Award The deadline to apply is April 1, 2017. All information and the application about the award can be found at: Annual Meeting Grant Awards . The AALL Grants Program provides financial assistance to experienced law librarians who are actively involved in AALL or its chapters and to newer law librarians or graduate students who hold promise of future ...
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Greetings, As a disclosure, I admit wasn't a fan of going to Texas in the middle summer to sweat and step over dead bats. But now, that the Lieutenant Governor is trying to pass an anti-transgender bathroom bill, I'm definitely not going. To further the ridiculousness, a Texas judge also decided to block a federal law to strengthen transgender rights: http://keyetv.com/news/local/texas-judge-blocks-federal-transgender-health-protections I'm not going to pretend I'm the go to advocate of LGBTQ rights. I also know my boycott will make no difference to motivated bigots. But, I like to think that I'm a decent person and that the AALL ought to have standards. ...
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In Canada, a court recently ruled that a paywall does not exempt news agencies and publishers from Canadian fair use rules. Fair dealing is the Canadian version of fair use in the United States. The concepts of fair use and fair dealing are similar, in that fair dealing provides an exemption from infringement for the use of protected works for purposes like research, education, parody, satire, criticism, and news. In this case, an online news agency, Blacklock's Reporter, a publication geared towards policy wonks, claimed that Canada's Department of Finance violated fair dealing by passing along two articles without authorization. Although subscribers ...
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**posted on behalf of the editorial board. please excuse cross-posting** The Journal of Copyright in Education and Librarianship ( https://www.jcel-pub.org/ ) welcomes submissions for our next issue, Spring 2017. Works accepted include original research, practitioner experience papers, or legal analysis that discuss copyright as it relates to education and librarianship. Papers are selected by a process of peer review, with double-blind review of each paper. Although the Journal is published bi-annually in the fall and spring, articles will become immediately available online after they pass through peer review and editing. For more information, ...
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Do you operate a website or provide internet access to faculty and grad students? And do you like not getting sued for copyright infringement? Then you should read this and update your DMCA Registered Agent filing with the Copyright Office. Back in the late 1990s Congress passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). The major provisions of DMCA created a system—commonly known as the notice-and-takedown system—that limits liability for online service providers such as ISPs, websites, and others, for copyright infringement claims based on their users’ conduct, but only so long as those providers agree to take down or stop the ...
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